The Front of the Train

So I have this fear. Well, not so much a fear as a rational opinion based on a series of facts. I do not like to sit in the front carriages of a train. Why? Because, should the train crash, those carriages are always the ones with the most carnage. And while I am not really afraid of death, I’d rather not die in a train crash. Or lose a limb. Or have any other permenant injury. I’d really just prefer to be at the very back of the train where I can go and help if something happened, rather than be one of the people needing help.  See? Totally rational right? 
And since I am a totally rational person who would prefer not to die or be injured in a train crash, I have actively avoided sitting in the first 3 carriages of any train, including metros, my entire trip. And it worked – until today.
Today I took a train to London from Paris. Things I learned: you have to go through full out airport-style customs to get onto the train. And once you have, they even have dutyfree stores. Just like airports. Cool. Also super glad I got to the train station an hour early; customs took forever. 
Thing I did not like: I was sitting backwards. Again. But this time I hadn’t eaten in 18hrs, so bright side: less motion sickness. Thing I really, really didn’t like: my assigned seat was Car 2, seat 83, AT THE VERY FRONT OF THE TRAIN. 😐 Cue massive internal freak out. Best part? Dude next to me kept muttering in angry French about the train company doing something stupid. When you are internally freaking out, having a super angry dude sitting next to you really doesn’t help. At all. 

I ended up walking to the food cart (safely 5 carriages in, away from potential danger), and stood there ‘eating’ random small things until I got tired of train surfing (there were no seats so you had to stand and ride the train like a surfboard and hope not to be thrown around by the shaking of the train. I claimed one of the tables to hold on to for better stability, but it was still super hard to stay still. Good leg and core workout though!)
Thankfully the train ride was uneventful. You couldn’t even tell when we went under the English Channel (which was a bit disappointing; I had hoped it would be more obvious.) And now I am safely in the hostel, waiting to check in.
One last thing before I end my post today – OMG I AM SO HAPPY EVERYONE SPEAKS ENGLISH NO MORE MIMING WHAT I MEAN I CAN ACTUALLY UNDERSTAND STREET SIGNS AND WHAT PEOPLE SAY AKDJDOSKSNDNDKSKSJSKSKSKSKSJSJSKS!!!!!!!!  As you can tell, I am pretty happy to be in England.

PS Dad – I am still alive. And can finally understand the people around me. It is glorious. 

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